10 grammar rules you can forget

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10 grammar rules you can forget

10 grammar rules you can forget

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Student Writers Wanted! Current Affairs / Fitness / Sport / Technology and more!

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Student Writers Wanted! Current Affairs / Fitness / Sport / Technology and more!

One of the U.K’s leading student blogs is looking for talented writers. 

This position is ideal for those who are looking to break into and gain experience in the world of journalism. 

The requirements for this position are: 

– A fluent / casual writing style 
– Commitment to write 3+ articles per week 
– Ability to self-motivate and be reliable 
– Be available by email throughout the day 

Is internet English debasing the language?

Articles, IB Diploma: Part 1 Language in Cultural Context, IB Diploma: Part 2 Language & Mass Communication, Uncategorized

Is internet English debasing the language? Not IMHO Read the full article at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/may/28/internet-english-debasing-language-steven-poole#ixzz2Ug9rHK4s

The internet might be a historic boon for kitten-fanciers and steaming-eared trolls, but it’s not all good news. Online writing, you see, is destroying the purity of English as we know it and threatening to dumb us all down into a herd of screen-jabbing illiterates. Or so runs one regular technophobic complaint, the latest version of which has been offered by Robert McCrum. He is worried about what he describes as “the abuse and impoverishment of English online (notably, in blogs and emails)” and what he perceives as “the overall crassness of English prose in the age of global communications”. 

Read the full article at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/may/28/internet-english-debasing-language-steven-poole#ixzz2UgA8DvKS

Do you grok it? ... Scrabble tiles spell out LOL . Photograph: Nick Sinclair /Alamy Read the full article at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/may/28/internet-english-debasing-language-steven-poole#ixzz2UgAX3CO0

Do you grok it? … Scrabble tiles spell out LOL . Photograph: Nick Sinclair /Alamy
Read the full article at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2013/may/28/internet-english-debasing-language-steven-poole#ixzz2UgAX3CO0

FCE Grading & Results

CAMBRIDGE ESOL EXAMINATIONS, Cambridge ESOL Examinations

The five FCE papers total 200 marks, after weighting. Each paper is weighted to 40 marks.
A candidate’s overall FCE grade is based on the total score gained by the candidate in all five papers. It is not necessary to achieve a satisfactory level in all five papers in order to pass the examination.

The overall grade boundaries (A, B, C, D and E) are set according to the following information:
• statistics on the candidature;
• statistics on the overall candidate performance;
• statistics on individual items, for those parts of the examination for which this is appropriate (Papers 1, 3 and 4);
• advice, based on the performance of candidates, and recommendations of examiners where this is relevant (Papers 2 and 5);
• comparison with statistics from previous years’ examination performance and candidature.

Results are reported as three passing grades (A, B and C) and two failing grades (D and E). The minimum successful performance which a candidate typically requires in order to achieve a Grade C corresponds to about 60% of the total marks. Statements of results are sent out to all candidates and include a graphical display of the candidate’s performance in each paper. These are shown against the scale Exceptional – Good – Borderline – Weak and indicate the candidate’s relative performance in each paper.

A CULTURAL CONTEXT FOR OTHELLO KRISTIN JOHNSEN-NESHATI

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othello1A CULTURAL CONTEXT FOR OTHELLO KRISTIN JOHNSEN-NESHATI

Scholars disagree as to when Shakespeare finished writing Othello, but we can date the play from its first performance by the King’s Men on November 1, 1604, at the court of James I. Multiple productions followed at the Globe and Blackfriars theatres, and the play was mounted at court again in 1612–1613 in honor of Princess Elizabeth’s wedding. Shakespeare’s principal source for the plot was a short story by the Italian writer Cinthio Giambattista Giraldi (1504-1574), who included it in a collection of 100 domestic stories titledHecatommithi, published in Venice in 1566. No English translation is believed to have existed before 1753, so Shakespeare may have read it in either the original Italian or in a French translation published in 1584. A handful of lines from Shakespeare’s text recall phrases from the Italian and French versions, suggesting that he may have read it in both languages……..